Labour Women’s Conference

 

Women’s annual conference is a two day affair this year, to be held in Telford on Sat 23-Sun 24 February. And thanks to the Democracy Review, two resolutions will go forward to Labour’s annual conference in September. Resolutions, delegations and nominations must be in by Monday 14 January. Please consider submitting a resolution in defence of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty, after Trump’s announcement he intends to withdraw. We’ve provided an explainer to help you argue the case.

CLPs can appoint 2 delegates (one of whom must be a disabled, BAME or LGBT woman) and nominate 3 CLP reps to the Women’s Conference Arrangements Committee. Jean Crocker and Teresa Clark who’ve done a great job so far, are standing again.

Report back from Labour’s annual conference

Fabian Hamilton, Shadow Minister for Peace & Disarmament, hosted Labour CND’s report back in parliament in October, and took the opportunity to outline his vision of a Peace Doctrine for Labour.

He made clear his support for signing the UN nuclear ban treaty, so the UK ‘will become a voice for eradicating nuclear weapons’. Walter Wolfgang described the 2018 conference was the most positive since the 1970s. But Lloyd Russell-Moyle MP urged us to carry on pushing for the positive change we want to see.

CND conference backs Defence Diversification Agency

 

A resolution from Labour CND together with Yorkshire and London CND was passed with acclaim at CND’s annual policy conference – committing CND to promote trade union and trades council affiliations and encourage relationships between CND groups and trade unions. Bristol CND who hosted the weekend did us proud – providing a beautiful building to meet in and a terrific open meeting focused on the centenary of World War I armistice.

Read the resolution here. 

Still buzzing from Labour Party Conference

Hello.  My name’s Karen Robinson.  I’m a new member of the Labour CND Executive Committee.  I’ve just got back from Labour Party Conference.  It was an exhilarating and inspiring five days, my third annual conference since re-joining Labour in late 2015.  I re-joined, as so many did, after Jeremy Corbyn was elected leader.

I was very active in the peace movement in the 1980’s, including taking part in many nonviolent protests against nuclear weapons. I had heard Jeremy speak at countless CND demonstrations over the decades, and was absolutely delighted when he was elected.  I watched the interview when he was asked if, as prime minister, he would press the button to launch a nuclear weapon.  His answer was a simple and very powerful ‘No’.  He received ferocious criticism.  It was then I decided to re-join.

Over the three conferences I have listened and learned, as a remarkable process of democratisation and adoption of progressive policies has unfurled.  This time I leafletted for Labour CND, helped out on the CND stall and supported a fringe meeting on defence diversification.  It was a really positive experience giving out Labour CND literature as delegates arrived at conference.  Many paused as they took in the words ‘Labour CND’, maybe because it had been a while since they’d heard the name ‘CND’, and then their faces lit up.  They were really happy we were there, and keen to keep in contact.  I think there’s huge scope for giving out even more leaflets next conference!

Corbyn ‘proud to present Walter Wolfgang’ with award

Jeremy Corbyn posted this video and comments after he visited Labour CND Vice President Walter Wolfgang in his home to hand over in person a Labour Party merit award.

Nuclear Education Trust launches Defence Diversification report

‘Employment in the UK arms industry has been in decline for several decades and is likely to continue,’ said Barnaby Pace, at the parliamentary launch of a Nuclear Education Trust report he authored, Defence Diversification: International learning for Trident jobs.

This decline is ‘due to the increasingly capital intensive nature of the work carried out in the UK, as well as automation, globalised supply chains, limited increases in defence spending and a highly competitive arms export market.’

Despite the 2016 vote to replace Trident, ‘uncertainties remain over the future of the programme’, Pace asserted – its affordability, technical feasibility, and the possibility that it will be scaled back or wound down in the event of a change of government.

The meeting, hosted by Labour’s Shadow Defence and Disarmament Minister Fabian Hamilton, included presentations by Paul Nowak, TUC Deputy General Secretary and Chris Williamson MP, and was followed by a round-table discussion.