Statement from Fabian Hamilton

Fabian Hamilton: I didn’t shout at Margaret Hodge for staying in the Government, even though I had voted against the Iraq war.

Labour’s Shadow Minister for Peace and Disarmament, himself a Jew, reports that he was confronted by Margaret Hodge for not defending her for calling Jeremy Corbyn anti-semitic and a racist. He told the i newspaper: ‘shortly after she allegedly lost her temper with Jeremy Corbyn, I got the next blast in the Lobby when she shouted at me for still remaining on the Front Bench and it wasn’t very calm or dignified. In fact, even as a hardened politician with 21 years’ experience in Parliament, I came away slightly upset and a little angry at being the butt of her frustration with Jeremy Corbyn. I recalled that when she was a Minister during the Iraq war, I didn’t shout at her for staying in the Government even though I had voted against the war.’

 

Hiroshima Ceremony

Dozens of ceremonies were held across Britain to commemorate the atomic bombing of Japan in 1945. Labour CND’s Ruth Brown is pictured here (second left) at Tavistock Square Gardens in central London. At a conservative estimate, 250,000 were killed as a result of US bombs dropped on Hiroshima on 6 August and Nagasaki on 9 August, and second and third generation Hibakusha are still suffering the effects.

 

Statement on Pete Willsman

Walter Wolfgang statement, 31 July 2018
I came to Britain as a refugee from Nazi Germany, with a strong and continuing commitment to Judaism, and still attend my synagogue regularly.  I have been a member the Labour Party for 70 years. As a former member of Labour’s National Executive Committee myself, I have served with Pete Willsman and know him to be a committed anti-racist and a strong supporter of Jeremy Corbyn. I am dismayed that Pete is under attack at the very time when the ballot for the NEC is taking place, and despite his deep and public apology. Pete Willsman is a staunch champion of party democracy. I will be voting for him, and urge Labour Party members to do likewise.

Support grows for global nuclear ban

Fifty nine countries have signed the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, and 10 have ratified it so far. But Theresa May has made clear that she has no intentions of Britain signing or ratifying the Treaty. We urge you to generate a debate in your local parties. Richmond Park CLP passed the following motion, submitted by former NEC member Walter Wolfgang:

This CLP notes that the non-nuclear nations are no longer satisfied to leave the promotion of nuclear disarmament to the nuclear powers. Instead they have drafted a treaty banning the production and use of nuclear weapons which is now subject to ratification. This CLP believes that the Labour Party should unequivocally commit itself to sign and ratify this treaty when in office. This implies that it will scrap and not replace the Trident missile programme.

Trump and the nuclear danger

Labour CND is holding a workshop on Trump and the nuclear danger at the Arise Festival of Labour’s Left Ideas in London, 10am on Saturday 28 July at Student Central, Malet Street, WC1E 7HY.

Speakers are Christine Blower (former General Secretary NUT), Ted Seay (US arms control specialist) and Carol Turner (Labour CND).

Festival details here:
http://labourassemblyagainstausterity.org.uk/arise-a-festival-of-labours-left-ideas/
www.facebook.com/ariselabourleftfestival

Our Democracy Review submission

Labour CND has made a submission to the Labour Party Democracy Review.

Overview:

How party democracy helps get a Labour government elected

A Labour government will only be voted into office if the electorate is convinced that the party’s commitments – on international as well as domestic policies – are equitable, fair and in the interests of society as a whole, not simply the few elites who exercise political, economic and social power.

In the last analysis, it’s policies that win elections. We believe that the most effective way of ensuring Labour hits the spot with the electorate is by:

  • electing a party leader who respects our members, and is prepared to listen to and reflect our views, recognising that half a million people provide a significant cross-section of opinion in British society as a whole;
  • greater involvement of members in deciding the policies contained in Labour’s manifesto;
  • ensuring CLPs and affiliates have clear and fair access to local, regional and national policy-making; and
  • integrating party members into policy-making structures at all levels.

Over a number of years differences of opinion within the party have been actively discouraged in the mistaken assumption that uniformity of view equates to unity of purpose. It does not. Debate is positive, not divisive. It guarantees issues are properly aired so that sound policy decisions can be reached.

Download full text:

LabCND democracy review submission